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Friday, July 3, 2015

SKINCARE TALK WITH BOLA AKINBOADE-BELLO: NATURAL ACNE TREATMENTS DO’s & DON’Ts


Whether it be one of those pricey products loaded with hard-to-pronounce ingredients, chemicals and remedies straight from the rumor mill (here's looking at you, toothpaste spot treatments), battling breakouts can be a head-scratching experience. And when you want to go the all-natural route, knowing what works becomes even tougher. We investigated 9 commonly-used, natural pimple fixes to find out if they'll really give you the clear skin you want—or if you're better off moving on to the next option.

THE REMEDY: ACUPUNCTURE
Does It Work? Maybe
Acupuncture aims to ease acne by targeting and treating its triggers instead of directly attacking acne-causing bacteria. So if your breakouts are caused by stress at work or if it's that time of the month, acupuncture can help. But it shouldn't be your sole acne-treatment method, particularly if you have severe acne i.e. the deep red, cystic type that often leaves scars and requires a more intensive approach to control it. Another thing you should probably know is that you need to be patient with acupuncture—it typically takes 8 to 10 consecutive weekly treatments to see a response.


THE REMEDY: CHANGING YOUR DIET
Does It Work? Most Likely
"The nutrients you're putting in your mouth eventually show up on your skin. That said, there simply aren't enough studies to pinpoint any one specific food as an acne-instigator for absolutely everyone. To get one step closer to clearer skin, cut back on foods with a high glycemic index (think cookies, cake, and chips). While these two types of food may not necessarily cause acne, studies show an association between them and breakouts. Load up on foods full of inflammation-fighting omega-3s, like wild salmon or trout.

THE REMEDY: APPLE CIDER VINEGAR
Does It Work? Maybe
First things first: drinking apple cider vinegar won't cure your acne, although it’s used topically as a toner, however, (Apple Cider Vinegar) ACV may help due to its acetic acid content, which is both antibacterial and antifungal and can kill acne-causing bacteria. But whether it clears skin or has little effect, rest assured that it won't do you any harm. You can test run it out by making your own ACV toner: Mix one tablespoon of the vinegar with two cups of water, and swipe onto clean skin with a cotton ball.

THE REMEDY: CLAY-BASED MASKS AND EXFOLIANTS
Does It Work? Yes!
There's good reason the natural beauty aisle is packed with clay masks: The masks can help dislodge pore-clogging oils and dirt according to deep research. And they're a better choice for people with sensitive skin and acne than salicylic or glycolic acid masks, which have the same pore-clearing effects but can-cause irritation. In contrast! Draw out impurities with this (Do It Yourself) DIY clay mask recipe:- Mix equal parts bentonite clay and apple cider vinegar, leave on for 45 minutes, then rinse with warm water. Repeat the process weekly. 

THE REMEDY: GREEN TEA EXTRACT
Does It Work? Yes!
By now you know that sipping on green tea can do your body good. But, as it turns out, applying the antioxidant-rich tea topically may help keep your skin clear by inhibiting the activity of your skin's oil-producing cells, says Wu. "Cold green tea compresses can help reduce inflammation and oil production as well as calm breakouts," she says. Your plan of action: Dip a thin washcloth in chilled green tea, wring it out, press it gently on the affected areas for 1-2 minutes, and repeat 4-5 times per session. Do it a few nights a week, or nightly, if you have time.

IN CONCLUSION!
Just before I drop the pen on this topic for today, let’s look at the last but not the final remedy that might likely work, but one thing is for sure! I’m still gonna write more on this topic in the weeks ahead.

(Bola Akinboade-Bello is a lifestyle blogger, fashion designer and beauty therapist/cosmetologist. She started her journey into the fashion and beauty industry as a model in 1999 and modelled for top fashion and beauty brands. In March 2006, she joined City People Media Group as a style writer, and rose with a short period to become the Fashion Editor. Her clothing line, Betyl BAT Clothing and Accessories and natural skincare range, Chanterelle Skincare, are doing great in the market)

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